Courses Fall 2016

Fall 2016 Undergraduate Courses

(jump to undergraduate courses)

GMAN 162a 01 (10939) 

Contemporary German Culture

Marion Gehlker

Analysis and discussion of current social and cultural trends. Topics drawn from newspapers, films, TV series, cabaret, short literary texts, and talks. Focus on oral and written production to improve upper-level linguistic skills. TTh 2.30-3.45

GMAN 171a 01 (10940) 

Introduction to German Prose Narrative

Regina Karl

Study of key authors and works of the German narrative tradition, with a focus on the development of advanced reading comprehension, writing, and speaking skills. Readings from short stories, novellas, and at least one novel. Writings by exemplary storytellers of the German tradition, such as Goethe, Kleist, Hebel, Hoffmann, Stifter, Keller, Kafka, Mann, Musil, Bachmann, and Bernhard. MW 11.35-12.50

GMAN 213a 01 (12488) /PHIL261

Realism, Idealism, and Romanticism

Paul Franks

Investigation of the possibility of individual agency and absolute reason in modernity. Introduction to figures from classical German philosophy such as Kant, Goethe, Mendelssohn, Jacobi, Fichte, Schelling, Schlegel, and Hegel. Themes include realism, idealism, romanticism, skepticism, nihilism, freedom, individuality, systematicity, and romantic irony. WF 9.00-10.15

GMAN 234a 01 (10941) /LITR244

German Fairy Tales

Henry Sussman

The influence of German fairy tales on the genre of fiction and on the emergence of psychology, psychoanalysis, and folklore. The fairy tale’s relation to romanticism; the importance of childhood sensibility to the fields of education, psychology, criticism, and cybernetics; the expansion of children’s literature into new mass media. MW 4.00-5.15

GMAN 248a 01 (10943) /HUMS236/LITR240

Goethe’s Faust

Kirk Wetters

Analysis of Goethe’s Faust, with special attention to Faust II, and to the genesis of Faust in its various versions throughout Goethe’s time. Emphasis on the work in context of Goethe’s lifetime and in the later time of both reception and criticism. Reading knowledge of German beneficial but not required. W 3.30-5.20

GMAN 272a 01 (11152) /FILM443/HUMS472

Fear

Paul North, Francesco Casetti

Examination of fear, as the pivotal passion in late modernity, through literature, philosophy, and film. Special emphasis on the twentieth century and the way cinema represents, causes, and reflects on fear. M 1.30-3.20

GMAN 273 01 (13587) /FILM319/LITR368

The Third Reich in Postwar German Film, 1945-2007

Jan Hagens

Close study of the intersection of aesthetics and ethics with regard to how German films, since 1945, have dealt with Nazi history. Through the study of German-language films (with subtitles), produced in postwar East, West, and unified Germany through 2007, students consider and challenge perspectives on the Third Reich and postwar Germany, while learning basic categories of film studies. M 2.30-4.30, M 6.30-9.00p

GMAN 337 01 (10946) /HUMS240/LITR341

Literature of Travel and Tourism

Kirk Wetters

A critical, historical introduction to the functions of travel narratives from the late eighteenth century to the present. Topics include travel and autobiography, fiction versus non-fiction, cosmopolitanism, travel as a means of individual experience and education, anthropology, and the contemporary culture of tourism. Focus will be on four works: Ransmayr’s Atlas of an Anxious Man (2012), Sebald’s ​The Rings of Saturn (1995), Goethe’s Italian Journey (1813/1817) and Georg Forster’s account of the Cook voyage (1772-1775). T 1.30-3.20

GMAN 375 01 (10949) /HUMS239/LITR436

Reading Late Capitalism

Henry Sussman

The fate of Marxian literature in view of sociocultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Exploration of the parameters and dimensions of Marx’s core texts, and pursuit of the fate of such major constructs as the commodity, alienation, class-conflict, and assembly-line manufacture, in the literature, cinema, and theoretical oversight of both centuries. Authors include Flaubert, Zola, Kafka, Lukács, Benjamin, Derrida, Jameson, and Piketty.

Previous coursework analyzing elaborate arguments and recognizing different methodological frameworks. T 3.30-5.20

Fall 2016 Graduate Courses

GMAN 607 01 (12624) 

Goethe’s Faust

Kirk Wetters

Goethe’s Faust, with special attention to Faust II and to the genesis of Faust in its various versions throughout Goethe’s lifetime; emphasis on the work in context of Goethe’s time and in the later reception and criticism. W 3.30-5.20

GMAN 651 01 (12625) /PLSC583/PHIL734

Contemporary Critical Theory

Seyla Benhabib

A careful examination of Hegel’s theory of the modern state and its elaboration by Habermas and Honneth. W 9:25–11:15

GMAN 711 01 (12628) 

Literature of Travel and Tourism

Kirk Wetters

A critical, historical introduction to the functions of travel narratives in the modern period. Topics include travel and autobiography, cosmopolitanism, travel as a means of individual experience and education, the rise and fall of anthropology, and the contemporary culture of tourism. T 1.30-3.20

GMAN 722 01 (12629) /HSAR718

Mimesis in Art and Nature

Paul North

Influential theories postulate that visual art and literature imitate nature. Recent scientific theories postulate that nature also imitates. We investigate what it means for anything to “look like” anything else, in readings of literature, art, and criticism. Authors and topics include Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, and Gerhard Richter on portraiture; Emanuel Swedenborg, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, and René Magritte on correspondence; Aristotle, Erich Auerbach, and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe on mimesis; Goethe, Darwin, Kafka, and Günter Wagner on natural similarities and homology; Peirce, Warburg, and Walker Evans on iconicity. Th 3.30-5.20

GMAN 741 01 (12631) 

Reading Late Capitalism

Henry Sussman

This is a course on the fate of Marxian literature in view of the sociocultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course not only explores the parameters and dimensions of Marx’s core texts but also pursues the fate of such major constructs as the commodity, alienation, class conflict, and assembly-line manufacture in the literature, cinema, and theoretical oversight of both centuries. As much attention is devoted to the Marxian imaginary as to the isolation and analysis of the key arguments. With key amplifying readings by Flaubert, Zola, Kafka, Lukács, Benjamin, Derrida, Jameson, and Piketty. T 3.30-5.20