Current Courses

For precise meeting times and places and credit information, please view Yale’s OCI page at http://students.yale.edu/oci/search.jsp

(jump to Spring 2017)

Fall 2016 Undergraduate Courses

GMAN 162 01 (10939) 

Contemporary German Culture

Marion Gehlker

Analysis and discussion of current social and cultural trends. Topics drawn from newspapers, films, TV series, cabaret, short literary texts, and talks. Focus on oral and written production to improve upper-level linguistic skills. TTh 2.30-3.45

GMAN 171 01 (10940) 

Introduction to German Prose Narrative

Regina Karl

Study of key authors and works of the German narrative tradition, with a focus on the development of advanced reading comprehension, writing, and speaking skills. Readings from short stories, novellas, and at least one novel. Writings by exemplary storytellers of the German tradition, such as Goethe, Kleist, Hebel, Hoffmann, Stifter, Keller, Kafka, Mann, Musil, Bachmann, and Bernhard. MW 11.35-12.50

GMAN 213 01 (12488) /PHIL261

Realism, Idealism, and Romanticism

Paul Franks

Investigation of the possibility of individual agency and absolute reason in modernity. Introduction to figures from classical German philosophy such as Kant, Goethe, Mendelssohn, Jacobi, Fichte, Schelling, Schlegel, and Hegel. Themes include realism, idealism, romanticism, skepticism, nihilism, freedom, individuality, systematicity, and romantic irony. WF 9.00-10.15

GMAN 234 01 (10941) /LITR244

German Fairy Tales

Henry Sussman

The influence of German fairy tales on the genre of fiction and on the emergence of psychology, psychoanalysis, and folklore. The fairy tale’s relation to romanticism; the importance of childhood sensibility to the fields of education, psychology, criticism, and cybernetics; the expansion of children’s literature into new mass media. MW 4.00-5.15

GMAN 248 01 (10943) /HUMS236/LITR240

Goethe’s Faust

Kirk Wetters

Analysis of Goethe’s Faust, with special attention to Faust II, and to the genesis of Faust in its various versions throughout Goethe’s time. Emphasis on the work in context of Goethe’s lifetime and in the later time of both reception and criticism. Reading knowledge of German beneficial but not required. W 3.30-5.20

GMAN 272 01 (11152) /FILM443/HUMS472

Fear

Paul North, Francesco Casetti

Examination of fear, as the pivotal passion in late modernity, through literature, philosophy, and film. Special emphasis on the twentieth century and the way cinema represents, causes, and reflects on fear. M 1.30-3.20

GMAN 273 01 (13587) /FILM319/LITR368

The Third Reich in Postwar German Film, 1945-2007

Jan Hagens

Close study of the intersection of aesthetics and ethics with regard to how German films, since 1945, have dealt with Nazi history. Through the study of German-language films (with subtitles), produced in postwar East, West, and unified Germany through 2007, students consider and challenge perspectives on the Third Reich and postwar Germany, while learning basic categories of film studies. M 2.30-4.30, M 6.30-9.00p

GMAN 337 01 (10946) /HUMS240/LITR341

Literature of Travel and Tourism

Kirk Wetters

A critical, historical introduction to the functions of travel narratives from the late eighteenth century to the present. Topics include travel and autobiography, fiction versus non-fiction, cosmopolitanism, travel as a means of individual experience and education, anthropology, and the contemporary culture of tourism. Focus will be on four works: Ransmayr’s Atlas of an Anxious Man (2012), Sebald’s ​The Rings of Saturn (1995), Goethe’s Italian Journey (1813/1817) and Georg Forster’s account of the Cook voyage (1772-1775). T 1.30-3.20

GMAN 375 01 (10949) /HUMS239/LITR436

Reading Late Capitalism

Henry Sussman

The fate of Marxian literature in view of sociocultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Exploration of the parameters and dimensions of Marx’s core texts, and pursuit of the fate of such major constructs as the commodity, alienation, class-conflict, and assembly-line manufacture, in the literature, cinema, and theoretical oversight of both centuries. Authors include Flaubert, Zola, Kafka, Lukács, Benjamin, Derrida, Jameson, and Piketty.

Previous coursework analyzing elaborate arguments and recognizing different methodological frameworks. T 3.30-5.20

Fall 2016 Graduate Courses

GMAN 607 01 (12624) 

Goethe’s Faust

Kirk Wetters

Goethe’s Faust, with special attention to Faust II and to the genesis of Faust in its various versions throughout Goethe’s lifetime; emphasis on the work in context of Goethe’s time and in the later reception and criticism. W 3.30-5.20

GMAN 651 01 (12625) /PLSC583/PHIL734

Contemporary Critical Theory

Seyla Benhabib

A careful examination of Hegel’s theory of the modern state and its elaboration by Habermas and Honneth. W 9:25–11:15

GMAN 711 01 (12628) 

Literature of Travel and Tourism

Kirk Wetters

A critical, historical introduction to the functions of travel narratives in the modern period. Topics include travel and autobiography, cosmopolitanism, travel as a means of individual experience and education, the rise and fall of anthropology, and the contemporary culture of tourism. T 1.30-3.20

GMAN 722 01 (12629) /HSAR718

Mimesis in Art and Nature

Paul North

Influential theories postulate that visual art and literature imitate nature. Recent scientific theories postulate that nature also imitates. We investigate what it means for anything to “look like” anything else, in readings of literature, art, and criticism. Authors and topics include Edgar Allan Poe, Nikolai Gogol, Oscar Wilde, and Gerhard Richter on portraiture; Emanuel Swedenborg, Charles Baudelaire, Walter Benjamin, and René Magritte on correspondence; Aristotle, Erich Auerbach, and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe on mimesis; Goethe, Darwin, Kafka, and Günter Wagner on natural similarities and homology; Peirce, Warburg, and Walker Evans on iconicity. Th 3.30-5.20

GMAN 741 01 (12631) 

Reading Late Capitalism

Henry Sussman

This is a course on the fate of Marxian literature in view of the sociocultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course not only explores the parameters and dimensions of Marx’s core texts but also pursues the fate of such major constructs as the commodity, alienation, class conflict, and assembly-line manufacture in the literature, cinema, and theoretical oversight of both centuries. As much attention is devoted to the Marxian imaginary as to the isolation and analysis of the key arguments. With key amplifying readings by Flaubert, Zola, Kafka, Lukács, Benjamin, Derrida, Jameson, and Piketty. T 3.30-5.20


Spring 2017 Undergraduate Courses

GMAN 151 01 (20623) 

Exploring Contemporary German Culture

Marion Gehlker

Advanced German course focusing on vocabulary expansion through reading practice; stylistic development in writing; and development of conversational German. Critical analysis of selected aspects of contemporary German culture, such as Green Germany, social movements from the 60s to today, the changing “Sozialstaat,” and current events. TTh 1.00-2.15

GMAN 174 01 (20626) 

Literature and Music

Kirk Wetters

An advanced language course addressing the close connection between music and German and Austrian literature. Topics include: musical aesthetics (Hoffmann, Hanslick, Nietzsche, Schoenberg, Adorno); opera (Wagner, Strauss-Hofmansthal, Berg); the “art song” or Lied (Schubert, Mahler, Krenek); fictional narratives (Kleist, Hoffmann, Mörike, Doderer, Bernhard). Prereq: GMAN 140 or higher. TTh 11.35-12.50

GMAN 208 01 (20702) /HIST254

Germany from Unification to Refugee Crisis

Jennifer Allen

The history of Germany from its unification in 1871 through the present. Topics include German nationalism and national unification; the culture and politics of the Weimar Republic; National Socialism and the Holocaust; the division of Germany and the Cold War; the Student Movement and New Social Movements; reunification; and Germany’s place in contemporary Europe. TTh 11.35-12.50

GMAN 225 01 (20627) /LITR362/FILM346

Intermediality in Film

Brigitte Peucker

1 HTBA Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater, painting, and video, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, framing, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, von Trier, Jarman, Godard, Haneke, Antonioni, Greenaway and others. T 3.30-5.20

GMAN 286 01 (20630) 

Medieval German Romance and Epic

Mary Paddock

Study of three great medieval works of Arthurian romance and courtly epic: Parzival, Tristan, and the Nibelungenlied. Literary transmission in both oral and written cultures, conventions and inventions of courtly narrative, courtly patronage and its historical context, moral and religious codes of knighthood and chivalric heroism. Readings in English translation. Th 3.30-5.20

GMAN 308 01 (20631) /LITR439

Rilke and Yeats

Carol Jacobs

Close readings of individual works by Rainer Maria Rilke and William Butler Yeats, with an eye to the theoretical implications of their writings. Th 1.30-3.20

GMAN 315 01 (21665) /LITR431/CPLT651/HUMS243/GMAN647/PHIL482/PHIL606

Systems and Their Theory

Henry Sussman

Conceptual systems that have, since the outset of modernity, furnished a format and platform for rigorous thinking at the same time that they have imposed on language the attributes of self-reflexivity, consistency, repetition, purity, and dependability. Texts by Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Kafka, Proust, and Borges. T 3.30-5.20

GMAN 376 01 (20636) /HUMS242/LITR246

Twentieth-Century German Fiction

Henry Sussman

Introduction to twentieth-century German fiction. Selected readings range from experimental (Walser, Kafka, Roth, Wolf) to classical (Mann, Musil) and from Austrians (Musil), Germans (Mann, Döblin, Wolf), Swiss (Walser), and Austro-Hungarians (Roth). Topics include: modernist improvisation and the turn to language; undercurrents of mystification and superstition in German thought; and radical political instability and cultural exploration under the Weimar Republic. MW 4.00-5.15

GMAN 415 02 (20639) /HUMS370/LITR233

Büchner: Between Romantic Comedy and Modern Science

Rüdiger Campe

Close reading of works by Georg Büchner, romantic poet and founder of the anticlassical tradition in German literature. The range of Büchner’s writings in terms of discourse and performative style, including comedy, tragedy, psychological case study, political pamphlet, philosophical lecture, and scientific paper. Attention to the interrelation between literary and nonliterary semantics. Readings in English and German. Discussion in English. W 1.30-3.20, 1 HTBA

Spring 2017 Graduate Courses

GMAN 559 01 (22307) 

Rilke and Yeats

Carol Jacobs

Study of the works of two twentieth-century authors who, in very different ways, challenge conventional modes in which to think about the relationship between literature and what we tend to call reality. We ask how to think about the performance of art and its implicit theorizations as crucial to this issue, and ponder the difference between the commitment to and lack of interest in a thematics of lived life. The nature and purpose of the course are to practice close reading as a mode of thinking and a path to theorizing. We explore how that theorization of the text takes place, not in a separate sphere, but out of the details and performance of individual literary works. Although our classes settle on individual works, students are expected to read much more widely in the corpus of the two poets. Th 1:30-3:20

GMAN 642 01 (22520) 

Büchner: Between Comedy and Science

Rüdiger Campe

Close reading of works by Georg Büchner, romantic poet and founder of the anticlassical tradition in German literature. The range of Büchner’s writings in terms of discourse and performative style, including comedy, tragedy, psychological case study, political pamphlet, philosophical lecture, and scientific paper. Attention to the interrelation between literary and nonliterary semantics.

Readings in English and German. Discussion in English. W 1:30-3:20

GMAN 647 01 (22309) /LITR431/CPLT651/HUMS243/GMAN315/PHIL482/PHIL606

Systems and Their Theory

Henry Sussman

Conceptual systems that have, since the outset of modernity, furnished a format and platform for rigorous thinking at the same time that they have imposed on language the attributes of self-reflexivity, consistency, repetition, purity, and dependability. Texts by Kant, Hegel, Bergson, Kafka, Proust, and Borges. T 3.30-5.20

GMAN 757 01 (22521) 

Medieval German Romance and Epic

Mary Paddock

Study of three great medieval works of Arthurian romance and courtly epic: Parzival, Tristan, and the Nibelungenlied. Literary transmission in both oral and written cultures, conventions and inventions of courtly narrative, courtly patronage and its historical context, moral and religious codes of knighthood and chivalric heroism. Th 3.30-5.20

GMAN 760 01 (22324) /CPLT905/FILM760

Intermediality in Film

Brigitte Peucker

Film is a hybrid medium, the meeting point of several others. This course focuses on the relationship of film to theater and painting, suggesting that where two media are in evidence, there is usually a third. Topics include space, motion, color, theatricality, tableau vivant, ekphrasis, spectatorship, and new media. Readings feature art historical and film theoretical texts as well as essays pertinent to specific films. Films by Fassbinder, Bergman, Murnau, von Trier, Rohmer, Godard, Kiarostami, and others, concluding with three films by Peter Greenaway. T 3:30–5:20